Obituaries

Bradley Van Ven Roy
B: 2017-12-10
D: 2017-06-25
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Van Ven Roy, Bradley
Marion Case
B: 1925-10-20
D: 2017-06-22
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Case, Marion
Arthur Williams
B: 1940-12-07
D: 2017-06-19
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Williams, Arthur
Mildred Wegner
B: 1927-02-12
D: 2017-06-19
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Wegner, Mildred
Brian Groves
B: 1960-09-03
D: 2017-06-17
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Groves, Brian
Celeste Van Remortel
B: 1917-09-05
D: 2017-06-15
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Van Remortel, Celeste
John Russell
B: 1928-03-20
D: 2017-06-13
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Russell, John
Clarence VanDenElzen
B: 1928-02-08
D: 2017-06-13
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VanDenElzen, Clarence
Rosella Heuvelman
B: 1921-03-03
D: 2017-06-10
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Heuvelman, Rosella
Margarete Pichler
B: 1927-04-16
D: 2017-06-07
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Pichler, Margarete
Linda Muchow
B: 1950-03-25
D: 2017-06-06
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Muchow, Linda
Angeline Lasee
B: 1911-07-03
D: 2017-06-06
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Lasee, Angeline
Elmer Tilque
B: 1930-10-02
D: 2017-06-05
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Tilque, Elmer
William Adriansen
B: 1925-10-30
D: 2017-06-04
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Adriansen, William
Randall Kohlhase
B: 1957-02-15
D: 2017-06-03
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Kohlhase, Randall
James Bilotti
B: 1958-03-01
D: 2017-06-02
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Bilotti, James
Shirley Thomas
B: 1945-06-27
D: 2017-06-02
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Thomas, Shirley
Marilyn Motiff
B: 1934-10-24
D: 2017-06-01
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Motiff, Marilyn
Ann Krause
B: 1930-07-04
D: 2017-05-27
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Krause, Ann
Elizabeth Malewiski
B: 1925-10-12
D: 2017-05-23
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Malewiski, Elizabeth
Albert Honkanen
B: 1930-12-07
D: 2017-05-23
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Honkanen, Albert

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860 N Webster Avenue
De Pere, WI 54115
Phone: 920-336-8702
Fax: 920-336-2150

FAQs - Cremation Services

Everyone thinks they know the answer to the question "what is cremation", but when it comes down to it, the facts are often just out of reach. If you're ready to make the cremation decision, but just need a few more answers to nagging questions you have about cremation, then this is the right place for you. We've listed some of the most common questions we hear on the subject of cremation for you here; if you don't see your specific question then we invite you to call us at 920-336-8702.

1. How long must we wait after their death before we can cremate a family member?
 
2. How much will I have to pay for the cremation?
 
3. Can I participate in the cremation?
 
4. Can I purchase an urn from another source, or must I buy one from you?
 
5. What should I do with my loved one's ashes?
 
6. If we choose cremation, does my loved one have to be embalmed?
 
7. How long will it take to cremate my family member?
 
8. What kind of fuel is used in the cremation?
 
9. Are people dressed when they are cremated?
 
10. Can we put special items in their cremation casket?
 
11. Does this mean we don't need to plan a commemoration service?
 
12. I'm thinking of placing my loved one's ashes in the care of a local cemetery. What is the difference between a columbarium and a mausoleum?
 
13. Can you tell us which type of service is right for us?
 
14. What "extra" fees or charges will I need to pay?
 
15. What are "cash advance items"?
 
16. Can we arrange to bury their ashes on cemetery grounds?
 
17. I'd like to write my loved one's obituary. Can I?
 

Question #1How long must we wait after their death before we can cremate a family member?
Answer:Unlike burial, cremation is irreversible. This requires us to be "extra diligent" in obtaining cremation authorization from the legally identified next-of-kin, as well as those from any necessary agencies (such as the medical examiner). During the mandatory 48 hour waiting period (in Wisconsin); the deceased will be held in a secure, dignified environment.

Question #2How much will I have to pay for the cremation?
Answer:When you contact us about the cost of your loved one's cremation, It is impossible for us to quote an accurate cost for cremation without further discussion; thus, we urge you to speak candidly about cremation costs with your funeral professional so we may find a solution that works for you.

Question #3Can I participate in the cremation?
Answer:Yes, you may. This is becoming a very popular option among the families we serve, with nearly half choosing to participate in or be present in the building for the cremation of their loved one. Families that have experienced the unique way we do things at our cremation center have compared the process to that of watching a vault go into the ground at the cemetery or watching a casket go into a mausoleum crypt.

Question #4Can I purchase an urn from another source, or must I buy one from you?
Answer:The FTC's Funeral Rule guides funeral directors in the ethical and fair presentation of funeral service options. The purchase of a cremation urn (or a casket, for that matter) from a second or third party sources is one of the rights it guarantees. Your funeral director cannot prevent you from, nor can they charge you an extra fee for, the purchase of a third-party cremation urn. And they cannot demand you are present for its delivery to the funeral home

Question #5What should I do with my loved one's ashes?
Answer:Again, as we've said elsewhere, the word "should" need not be part of our conversation. There are many things you can do with their ashes–including simply taking them home with you for safekeeping. There may come a time when you know exactly what you'd like to do with them, but it may not be right now. Be patient; the right way to care for them will surface in time. After all, there are a lot of options: scattering them on land or sea is one of the most common; but you can also use the cremated remains in keepsake jewelry or to create meaningful pieces of art. As we said, there is no have-to-do; there's only a want-to-do (and you are in complete control of it). If you're curious about your options, just give us a call. We'll share what we know.

Question #6If we choose cremation, does my loved one have to be embalmed?
Answer:The short answer is "no", but there are exceptions. Let's say you want to have a public viewing or visitation, our funeral home policy requires embalming in the interest of public health.

Question #7How long will it take to cremate my family member?
Answer:Naturally, this question is best answered when we talk specifics: why type of cremator will be used? How large an individual was your loved one? Usually it takes 2 - 2 1/2 hours for the process. A cool-down period follows, and then the cremated remains are processed for a uniform appearance. Certainly, if the issue is important to you, we urge you to speak to your funeral director. Since we own and operate our own crematory, our turn-around time is far superior to those funeral homes that outsource their cremations.

Question #8What kind of fuel is used in the cremation?
Answer:Our cremation equipment runs on natural gas, which is an extremely clean burning fuel. We took special care when selecting our cremation equipment to ensure it far surpasses even the the most stringent environmental requirements.

Question #9Are people dressed when they are cremated?
Answer:You'd be surprised how often we hear this question! Some people might choose to be undressed; but most of the time, the deceased is dressed in the clothing they've selected prior to their death, or chosen by family members after their passing.  

Question #10Can we put special items in their cremation casket?
Answer:It depends upon what you mean as "special", but we do our best to accommodate the wishes of surviving family members. Most commonly, families will ask to place notes, children's drawings, or other personal messages of love; but it is our general policy not to cremate valuable jewelry or metallic objects that may interfere with our cremation equipment.

Question #11Does this mean we don't need to plan a commemoration service?
Answer:Certainly not; cremation merely describes the type of physical end-of-life care you intend to provide your loved one. A commemoration service is for the living; the individuals emotionally impacted by the death deserve the same level of compassionate attention. And one of the benefits of cremation comes from the larger "window-of-opportunity" in which to plan a meaningful celebration-of-life it provides the surviving family members. Your funeral professional can guide you in making all the necessary service arrangements.

Question #12I'm thinking of placing my loved one's ashes in the care of a local cemetery. What is the difference between a columbarium and a mausoleum?
Answer:Think of the Taj Mahal in India and you'll know exactly what a mausoleum is: it's free-standing building (in this case not in India but on the grounds of a local cemetery), which is intended as both a monument as well as the burial location for casketed individuals. A columbarium is the same in purpose, but not in design; instead of crypt spaces large enough for a full-size casket; it features smaller niche spaces, large enough for one (or maybe two) cremation urns.

Question #13Can you tell us which type of service is right for us?
Answer:We would never presume to tell you which service is best for your loved one. But your funeral director will be pleased to guide and advise; explain the differences between service formats (traditional funeral, memorial service and celebration-of-life), and share stories of meaningful services they've been a part of–all with the intention of empowering you to make the decision for yourselves.

Question #14What "extra" fees or charges will I need to pay?
Answer:It's difficult for us to answer this question without knowing the specifics of your proposed cremation arrangements. Yet with that said we can tell you there will most likely be extra charges for anything that involves a second-party purchase (such as the publication of your loved one's obituary in a local newspaper). If you select a decorative cremation urn and would like to personalize it; there could be a small fee.

Question #15What are "cash advance items"?
Answer:Cornell University Law School's Legal Information Institute (www.law.cornell.edu) defines a “cash advance item” as "any item of service or merchandise...obtained from a third party and paid for by the funeral provider on the purchaser's behalf. Cash advance items may include, but are not limited to: cemetery or crematory services; clergy honoraria; flowers; musicians or singers; obituary notices and death certificates."

Question #16Can we arrange to bury their ashes on cemetery grounds?
Answer:Yes, you can. The burial can be in-ground, or your loved one's cremation urn can be placed in a columbarium niche. Speak with your funeral director to learn more about your specific cremation burial options.

Question #17I'd like to write my loved one's obituary. Can I?
Answer:Yes- we strongly encourage families to write their own obituaries, as they are often one of the most personal aspects of the funeral arrangements. We are pleased to assist you, but it is difficult for us to write someones' life summary, especially when we are not as close to them as you are.

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